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Lecture: The History and Culture of the Tanbour (Persian lute)

May 4 2018 - 18:30
Ali Akbar Moradi is an acclaimed Iranian musician. He is a master tanbour (Persian lute) player and expert in the history and form of the instrument. He began playing the tanbour at the age of seven and learned not only the music but the Kurdish maqam repertoire. He has won awards, recorded several albums, and performed in Europe, the United States, and Canada with singers like Shahram Nazeri and at the Royal Festival Hall in London. In addition to teaching the tanbour in Tehran and his hometown of Kermanshah, Ali Akbar is a dedicated scholar of the tanbour and continues to develop the legacy ...

Thinking the Unthinkable: Foucault and the Islamic Revolution

May 3 2018 - 18:30
Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi is a professor of history and sociology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His books include Foucault in Iran: Islamic Revolution after the Enlightenment. He examines the French philosopher Michel Foucault's writings on the Iranian Revolution in responses to questions such as: Was Foucault wrong about the Islamic Revolution in Iran or did he find an instance of his philosophy of history? 

Bahram Beyzaie Discusses "Crossroads" Play

Apr 23 2018 - 18:30
Professor Bahram Beyzaie gives a talk on his recent play "Crossroads." As with past productions, Professor Beyzaie will discuss the creation of the play and will be joined by the "Crossroads" cast to engage with audience questions after his talk. Part of the Stanford Festival of Iranian Arts. 

The Candle That Lit the Flame: Amnesty International and the Origins of the Iranian Revolution

Apr 17 2018 - 18:30
Roham Alvandi is associate professor of international history and Director of the Cold War Studies Project at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He explores the role of the "human rights revolution" of the 1970s and the origins of the 1979 Iranian Revolution. He is the author of Nixon, Kissinger, and the Shah: The United States and Iran in the Cold War. Add to Google Calendar

Why Was Towfigh Permanently Banned?

Apr 5 2018 - 18:30
Abbas Towfigh taught at several universities in Iran and is a poet, author, writer, satirist, and the former editor-in-chief of "Towfigh" satirical paper. He discusses the ban on the most influential satirical paper in modern Iranian history.  Add to Google Calendar
Reza

The Power of Photography for Social Change

Mar 13 2018 - 18:30
REZA is an acclaimed photojournalist whose work has been featured in National Geographic, Time Magazine, Stern, Newsweek, El País, Paris Match, as well as a series of books, exhibitions and documentaries made for the National Geographic Channel. He discusses the importance of using images to serve social change, by training younger generations to become the actors of the future. Part of the Stanford Festival of Iranian Arts Add to Google Calendar

A Reflection on My Last Novel: Ask the Mirror

Mar 8 2018 - 18:30
Chahla Chafiq is an author, researcher, and human rights activist.  Chahla's writings both in Persian and French include essays, research articles, short stories, and novels. She discusses her newest book, Ask the Mirror (2015), and reflects on literature and exile. Part of the Stanford Festival of Iranian Arts Add to Google Calendar
Picture of Jahan Ramadan

A Bridge Taken for a Wall, a Wall Taken for a Bridge: On Persian Art, Poetry, and Translation

Dec 7 2017 - 18:30
Jahan Ramazani is University Professor and Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is currently writing a book on poetry in a global age. This talk on poetry, art, and East-West translation ranges from ancient Iran to medieval Byzantium and the Abbasid era to modern Iran and Ireland. The lecture is in three parts. The first looks at the Persian artistic influences via Byzantium on a modern Irish poet that have passed largely unrecognized (a bridge taken for a wall). The second looks at a Persian poet whose accessibility in English translation has perhaps been ...
Picture of Dr. Nima Naghibi

Women Write Iran: Nostalgia and Human Rights from Diaspora

May 4 2017 - 18:30
Nima Naghibi is Chair and Associate Professor of English at Ryerson University in Toronto.  Her research is in the areas of postcolonial and diaspora studies, and life narratives with particular attention to questions of human rights and social justice.  She is the author of the books Women Write Iran: Nostalgia and Human Rights from the Diaspora (Minnesota Press, 2016) and Rethinking Global Sisterhood: Western Feminism and Iran (Minnesota Press, 2007), and many essays and articles. The Stanford Bookstore will be at the event with copies of Dr. Naghibi's newest book for sale.

Iran and South Africa

Mar 9 2017 - 18:30
Dr. Houchang Chehabi is a Professor of International Relations and History at the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, Boston University. His lecture discusses the close relationship Iran and South Africa have had since the 1970s and the evolution of this relationship, touching on politics, economics, and religion. Co-sponsored by the Stanford Center for African Studies.

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